,

Reminiscing my RA Journey.

…The positive and the negative influencers.

 

Off late I have been rerunning my journey with rheumatoid arthritis. It has bought up so many pent-up emotions I thought were long gone, and memories I have chosen to forget. Often it is not enough for us to understand our own anguish in the fight with rheumatoid arthritis, but for us to explain it to people is another uphill task.

But the one crucial thing I remember most was trying to educate people to understand, when I myself was so confused and lost.

A very common situation was when people asked how I am feeling. If I said I’m fine and they knew that I’m not, I used to say to myself, please don’t push me to really tell you how I feel. I fear that if I told you the truth I sound like a cry baby, hence I say that I am “fine” and seriously some know the truth but are quite relieved to hear this false statement so that they continue a normal conversation and make you feel they are with you in it!

Many RA symptoms like pain and fatigue aren’t visible. It’s no wonder we get comments like, ‘You don’t look sick.’ In addition, the disease is so unpredictable that it’s difficult for people to understand that we may be able to do something one day and not be able to accomplish the same task the next hour or day. People have no idea how sick someone is on the inside when they can only see the outside. RA as an illness that is all but invisible to the naked eye.

Usually Arthritic Warriors are told that their symptoms are all in their head and that they should just exercise or get occupied in some tasks. It is very easy for people to give advice, but I suggest just for a moment be empathetic and envision the Arthritic warrior’s real situation. It is difficult. If others don’t know about the problems with RA, they think you’re being an antisocial snob. If you try to explain anything about your type of RA problems, they think you’re a complainer. It’s a no-win. Hence it is easier and diplomatic for me to keep them at bay.

It was incredibly difficult being affected at a young age and fighting a pain that no one could see, the most difficult part is dealing with comments from people who really don’t take the time to understand what rheumatoid arthritis is, nor how it affects my husband, daughter and myself. I have come along way but I’m still learning to ignore the negative people if or any in my life.

To end as of now behind my joyful grin, since I was only human and that before I learnt to be positive, my hardest days involved perpetual negative thoughts that would replay over and over again in my mind. Over time, I skillfully turned those negative thoughts into positive intonations through repeated, daily practice. As a result, my efforts enabled me to find true happiness in the midst of a disease that has, at times, almost pushed me to my breaking point.

I remember my then 10-year-old daughter hugging me and saying that it will take away all my pain, I am reminded how I could never had made this journey without my husband and daughter. I have never been alone on this journey my family has been there with me the whole time supporting me. Its our famous trio behind closed doors that have been here fighting for this wonderful life I have today and with God’s grace, despite rheumatoid arthritis, that I live every day.

Learning to be content with your life despite your diagnosis is something that anyone can do. All you have to do is make the decision to be happy. As long as you keep choosing happiness and never give up hope, RA can never bring you down.

Thank you, my loving duo, for being there with me and wish and pray that all the other Arthritic Warriors find such support and love in their own personal arthritic journey.

God Bless us all on our journey back to health and happiness.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *