Food for Thought

 

With pain in our joints, determination in our minds and hope in our hearts we start
digging and turning over every rock or mortar we can find to see if there is some
sort of relief. We all know by now that, many claims have been made about the
influence of food habits and nutritional supplements on arthritis. Some of these
claims are supported by medical evidence and some are reasonable theories.
However, for most of these claims, we are just not sure. the research into food and
diet as a real treatment option has lagged in my opinion. Food does much more
than simply provide you with fuel. It may promote or worsen health, depending on
what you eat.
However, I would like to share my side of the story as I have been living with RA
for over 15 years plus. I definitely have relied on my medications prescribed by my
Rheumatologist, and feel safe and secured in my present moment. To support my
medications, I have arrived at one important personal conclusion that eating the
right foods definitely has helped me through my journey with RA!
Having a Food Plan is that YOU are in charge. It’s your choice to check out the
various options and it’s up to you to measure and monitor what’s happening with
your body. The successes are what help you “stick with it” when it’s tough. If you
know that certain foods hurt you, and you’ve been able to document that by
conducting your own personal case journal study then it will be that much easier to
say “no thank you” to certain foods.
Because some symptoms are commonly associated with many different things that
you’ve probably never stopped to consider that they might be caused by the foods
you’re eating. It is easy to write off nausea as food poisoning or a runny nose with
the cold. But sometimes these symptoms are a sign of food tolerances or an allergy
that you didn’t even know you had.
Correct diagnosis, counseling, and avoidance advice based on valid allergy test
results reduces the incidence of symptoms and need for medications, and improves
quality of life. To assess the presence of allergen-specific IgE antibodies, two
different methods are usually used: a skin prick test, or an allergy blood test.
I have undergone both the tests. The skin prick test specifically resulted in me
being allergic to certain foods and medicines. Immediately I was cautious and kept
them away and have experienced more pain free days. The bottom line is -there’s
no established arthritis diet plan. What works for one person may not work for
someone else. Trial and error will help you determine which foods you need to
remove from your diet. In general, arthritis warriors need to make genuine efforts
towards having lifestyle changes that can help to increase their chance of
maintaining a good quality of life. We are what we eat!

3 replies
  1. Deja Halifax
    Deja Halifax says:

    I like the valuable info you provide in your articles. I’ll bookmark your blog and check again here frequently. I’m quite sure I will learn many new stuff right here! Best of luck for the next!

    Reply

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