Embracing Small Life’s Celebrations Keeps our Hope and Joy Alive!

Past few years, celebrations would probably be considered fiascos if they were to be judged by traditional standards. Yet, I’ll never regret trying my best to recreate the special traditions my mom and dad made throughout our childhood. Celebrations, no matter how small they are, give life some feel. If anyone needs something to make one day stand out from all the others, it’s those who are already managing with the challenges and tediousness that often come with unseen illness.

We cherish special life milestones like birthdays and anniversaries for a reason. They epitomize continuity and growth, the unbroken threads that shape a person’s life. They are a sign of triumph over adversity, of strength, and of hope, particularly in the later years when they represent years of life’s experience. The importance of celebrating life is mirrored in physical and mental health, community and family relationships and a healthy inner self-concept.

Life is full of celebratory moments; it is imperative to understand things that give you happiness and make you feel worthy. Even the smallest of celebrations we allow ourselves can help build positive emotions. When we take time to embrace the little moments, we’re less likely to go down the rabbit hole with stress and less likely to get physically sick.

Such emotions give us resilience and fortify us with happy memories.

Over the past years as I look back on my life as a RA Warrior; I like the person I see in the mirror. I have developed a strong mental strength that has allowed me to motivate myself and be a motivator to others. I have been at the lowest point in my life some years ago, but I have managed to come out on top. And all this has come with the Inner Healthy Self-concept mindset and the grace of the Almighty!

A healthy person or a person with a chronic condition appreciates the whole curve of life as a continuous journey, interspersed by moments of pain and of joy but always changing. Special occasions are the milestones along this journey, chances to stop and reflect on life as a whole, and on the person, who has lived it. Giving people the chance to celebrate these milestones is an essential way to nurture their inner health.  Celebration isn’t just a party, it’s a way to show someone that they matter, that their journey has meaning. Hence care givers should work around organizing such occasions. Caregivers can’t take away the illnesses or the pain, however, for one can attempt to bring a little light into the lives. It often takes some trial and error and some imagination, but one can figure out what works. The joy and comfort of these events is an important source of strength for people, even when they may lack the energy to do all the planning themselves.

I am grateful for every birthday and the opportunity I have been given to share the good and the bad with others. I will never give up hope that one day we will find a cure for this condition called RA!

Yes, it is true that we have real-world challenges with the current Covid situation, but we should give extra attention to the good things in life, too. In all these cases, the answer is to stay focused on the importance of celebrating life. We should celebrate the little successes and that helps keep us linked in tough times.

These moments of celebration make us pause and be mindful, and that lifts our well-being.

The advantages of celebration are universal, and can be as powerful in a small, quiet gathering as in a big party.

According to social psychology researcher Fred Bryant and others, when we stop to savor the good stuff, we buffer ourselves against the bad and build resilience—and even mini-celebrations can plump up the positive emotions which make it easier to manage the daily challenges that cause major stress

So ….Let us keep celebrating our lives at the drop of a hat all we Arthritic Warriors !!!

 

 

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