An RA Update

People have long feared rheumatoid arthritis (commonly called RA) as one of the most disabling types of arthritis. The good news is that the outlook has greatly improved for many people with newly diagnosed (detected) RA. Of course, RA remains a serious disease, and one that can vary widely in symptoms (what you feel) and outcomes. Even so, treatment advances have made it possible to stop or at least slow the progression (worsening) of joint damage.

We are all aware our Rheumatologists now have many new treatments that target the inflammation that RA causes. They also understand better when and how to use treatments to get the best effects.

RA is an autoimmune condition, which means it is caused by the immune system attacking healthy body tissue. But so far it is not clearly known what triggers it.

Your immune system normally makes antibodies that attack bacteria and viruses, helping to fight infection.

If you have RA, your immune system mistakenly sends antibodies to the lining of your joints, where they attack the tissue surrounding the joint.

This causes the thin layer of cells (synovium) surrounding your joints to become sore and inflamed, releasing chemicals that damage nearby; bones, cartilage, tendons and ligaments.

Small joints in the hands and feet are most commonly affected. Sometimes RA can affect your organs, such as eyes, skin or lungs

Have been working on ppt presentations on the above – a basic patient awareness version which I have accumulated through my various visits to all the medical professionals through the last 18 years!

Coming soon…

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